Research Tag Bilingualism

A Pilot Study of Singapore’s Young Chinese Parent’s Perceptions, Attitude and Behaviours Towards Bilingual Learning

Written by Assistant Professor Aw Guat Poh, Dr Connie Lum, Peng Xuan-hui, Chen Yuan and Tong Qi-ying, this paper describes and examines parents’ attitude, perceptions and behaviours towards bilingual education in Singapore. Through the findings, this paper offers insights on the impacts of the “English knowing bilingualism” policies on parents’ linguistic choices and behaviours. It also highlights common misconceptions on bilingual learning, where further research was suggested to explore and investigate these findings deeper.

Literacy development at the Little Skool House Report (Time 4)

Written by Dr Seetoh Peipei and Dr Connie Lum, this report discusses how Little Skool House’s curriculum influences children’s language trajectories in English and Mandarin. This report follows the fourth phase of this literacy development research, in which the children’s receptive and expressive (vocabulary) language development are evaluated at the start (January/February) and end (November/December) of their Primary One school term. Parents’ perception of Little Skool House’s curriculum and their children’s adjustment to primary school as well as their social skills development are also examined in the report.

新加坡华裔家庭幼儿英汉双语学习环境调查 (A Survey of English-Chinese Bilingual Learning Environment of Children from Chinese Families in Singapore)

Written by Dr Connie Lum et al., this paper describes and analyses Singaporean children’s English and Chinese bilingual learning environment through a survey administered to their parents. It reported that parents with higher English proficiency levels tend to be more willing to communicate in Chinese to their children. Yet, results also showed that parent’s English proficiency levels are negatively correlated with the frequency of the children’s use of Chinese language. Through the findings, this paper presents possible explanations for the results obtained and suggests that Chinese parents have the capacity to create a conducive bilingual learning environment in their families.